boardroom information security

Boardroom Information Security Questions

More than ever before, boards are faced with the daunting task to ensure their company is protected in the event of an online attack. Just a decade or so ago, boardroom information security questions regarding digital risk rarely made it into the agenda.

Instead, companies instructed c-suite leaders to deal with the duty of establishing and maintaining cybersecurity standards.

As larger data breaches have wreaked havoc on major organizations, however, board members have begun to recognize their important role in risk management for board information security.

In order to maintain a proactive approach, we recommend that directors ask a lot of questions—these included:
Continue reading

Tallinn, Estonia

What e-Residency Means for Your Board

In 2014, Estonia launched a virtual residency program which grants a digital identity to entrepreneurs across the globe. While this digital identity is linked to a physical authentication card, it doesn’t serve as a passport. However, an Estonian digital identity act, in a sense, as a “passport to the digital world”.

Estonian e-Residents have access to the country’s vast network of business and financial services. This includes the ability to start, manage, and grow an international business from anywhere in the world. This innovative approach to international business has sparked the interest of many a progressive board member.

Let’s take a closer look at what Estonia’s e-Residency program means for your business and your board.
Continue reading

California quota law

California Quota Law: Empowerment or Impediment?

A new California law aimed at breaking the glass ceiling has become the buzz of boardrooms across the country. On Sunday, Governor Jerry Brown signed a bill, passed by state legislators in August, requiring all publicly-traded companies headquartered in California to include at least one female board member by the end of the year.

By the end of 2021, boards with five members must include two women and boards with six members must include three or more—and “inclusion” is the operative word, here.

Continue reading

entrepreneur

Does Your Board Need an Entrepreneur?

Board members tend to have lots of experience in at least one of these three areas: financial expertise, industry-specific knowledge, or operational management. Over the past couple of decades, though, companies have become more interested in diversifying their boardroom—both in race and gender as well as in expertise.

Today, you’ll find individuals with backgrounds in marketing, IT, and human resources in addition to the “classic” board member tracks.

The latest trend, however, is adding someone with an entrepreneurial background to your team of directors, and we’re big fans of this movement.

Here’s what an entrepreneur can bring to the table:

A focus on long-term, strategic thinking

Boards are constantly being pulled between short term goal-oriented oversight and long term, strategically focused planning. Entrepreneurs are generally going to default to strategic thinking and will help pull your board out of conversations that should be left to your company’s C-suite.
Continue reading

shareholder activism

Shareholder Activism: What Board Members Need to Know

Shareholder activism plays a pivotal role in the evolution of corporate America’s public companies. In fact, the listed companies that shareholders targeted in
2013
“had an average market capitalization of $10 billion.”

That’s some serious power when it comes to influencing major corporations in the United States.

But what does shareholder activism really mean? To put it simply, shareholder activism occurs when an individual (or an entity) uses their equity stake in a corporation to put pressure on the company to make specific changes.
Continue reading

company culture

Company Culture Starts With Corporate Governance

You’ve seen the headlines—“company culture” is one of the most-covered topics in business leadership over the past couple of years. You can read about why you shouldn’t just let your company culture happen.

You can explore “Why Corporate Culture Is Becoming More Important.” And, you can see how productive culture will boost your organization’s performance.

Before we launch into how company culture begins with the board, let’s define the term we’re using.

The Definition of Company Culture

According to Wikipedia, company culture (also referred to as organizational culture) “encompasses values and behaviors that contribute to the unique social and psychological environment of an organization…and includes the organization’s vision, values, norms, systems, symbols, language, assumptions, environment, location, beliefs, and habits.”

Yes, that’s a long definition! To simplify, culture is created through a blend of the practices, policies, and people that make up an organization.
Continue reading

Directorpoint European expansion

Directorpoint Celebrates the Launch of a European Data Center

Big news from the Directorpoint team! This summer has seen our company reach several milestones.

New Directorpoint European Data Center

Directorpoint is thrilled to announce the opening of an official headquarters and data center in the UK. As our number of European clients has grown, we have actively pursued ways to improve their product experience.

The establishment of the data center, in particular, will allow clients in the European Union to experience significantly faster download and upload speeds while using our software. The Directorpoint team sees this European expansion as the next step for extending its international reach.

Continue reading

corporate governance books

Top Five Corporate Governance Books

Are you looking to take a deeper dive into the world of corporate governance? We’ve put together a collection of books and reading suggestions for board directors.

Reading Suggestions for Board Directors

Dear Chairman

This fascinating read by hedge fund manager and adjunct professor at Columbia Business School, Jeff Gramm, digs deep into the ever-evolving relationship between corporate directors and shareholder activists.

“Gramm analyzes different eras and pivotal boardroom battles from the last century to understand the factors that have caused shareholders and management to collide. Throughout, he uses the letters to show how investors interact with directors and managers, how they think about their target companies, and how they plan to profit.”

Who should read? Public company and corporate directors as well as board members with an interest in the history of shareholder activism.
Continue reading

Dealing With Unprepared Board Members

As with any group setting, when you bring a board of directors together, some members will be more prepared than others. Most directors will study reports in advance and be ready to share their input accordingly.

Others, however, may feel more inclined to coast through the meeting, glean what they can, and share opinionated statements on the spot.

These unprepared board members can occasionally create a difficult group dynamic.

The good news, though, is that there are steps your board can take towards encouraging (and even helping) members to adequately prepare.

Continue reading