Secondary Motions and How They Work

Secondary motions

Beyond the basic building blocks of main motions, there are three categories of secondary motions: subsidiary, incidental, and privileged. Though it may sound overwhelming, each of these kinds of motions has a very specific role in how board members can interact with main motions.

Subsidiary Motions

Simply stated, subsidiary motions are put forth in order to propose changes or actions upon the main motion. When made, this kind of secondary motion supersedes the main motion and must be addressed before returning to the question of the main motion. Subsidiary motions have an order of precedence, which must be followed in a parliamentary setting:
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Main Motions: The Building Blocks of the Boardroom

Main motions

“Mr. Chairman, I move that…we learn more about main motions!

Seconded!”

Main motions are what people usually envision when they think of making a motion in a setting that utilizes parliamentary procedure. These statements usually begin with the statement, “I move that…” and must be seconded by another member of the gathering in order to proceed. According to Robert’s Rules Online, a main motion (sometimes called a principal motion) is “a motion made to bring before the assembly, for its consideration, on any particular subject…It takes precedence of nothing…and it yields to all privileged, incidental, and subsidiary motions.” In other words, main motions are the larger questions that are up for debate, but they can be altered, delayed, or affected by the other types of motions.
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Understanding Boardroom Parliamentary Procedure

boardroom parliamentary procedure gavel

Why does a motion always have to be seconded? Why can’t a board chair just call a vote at their discretion? Although board meetings mostly involve basic discussion, the ins and outs of boardroom parliamentary procedure can be daunting and raise many questions for new board members and experienced board members alike.

Most boardrooms lean heavily on Robert’s Rules of Order. This particular style of parliamentary procedure is “based on the consideration of the rights of the majority, of the minority, of individual members, of absentee members, of all of these groups taken together.” Boards commit to a set of guidelines like those laid out by Robert’s Rules for a number of reasons: to establish order during the meeting, to keep discussion focused and moving forward, to make the voting process more clear, and to provide equal footing for all board members.
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Being a Better Nonprofit Board Member

Better nonprofit board member

People often assume that being a good nonprofit board member boils down to two basic capabilities: being a good fundraiser and being a good donor. However, we know that being an outstanding nonprofit board member takes a whole lot more. As the world continues to be shaped and stimulated by the good work of nonprofit organizations, it’s important that board members embrace their full role in corporate governance. They have the potential to help their organizations reach new levels of growth and impact.

FIELD TRIPS! First and foremost, board members should interact with their organization’s mission where it’s happening. Taking field visits is a great way to understand the nonprofit’s ultimate output. It also helps board members connect with their role in a more passionate way. Not to mention, these visits lead to enlightening questions from board members and an evaluative process to help the board strategize for an effective path forward.
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Directorpoint Celebrates Its Best Year Yet

Directorpoint

We don’t mean to pat ourselves on the back, but we think 2016 was our best year yet! Not only did we receive some outstanding recognition, add exciting clients, and open an office in another country, we also worked tirelessly to make our software even more impactful and user-friendly. Some of our most memorable accomplishments from 2016 include:

  • Experienced 68.3% client growth and were privileged to have formed partnerships with several outstanding organizations, such as the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (P.S. They give out the Oscars!).
  • Established an Australia-based office and data center to better serve our international client base.
  • Were named one of the fastest growing companies based in Birmingham by Birmingham Business Journal’s “Fast Track 30” for the second consecutive year!
  • Introduced our weekly newsletter –“The Point” as well as consistent, informative blog content on our website. (Subscribe for regular updates!)

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Effective Remote Board Meetings

Effective Remote Board Meetings

Ideally, every member of your board can be present at each meeting you schedule. Real world responsibilities often get in the way of that goal, though. Many directors serve on multiple boards, travel for work, or run companies of their own. In some instances, joining a meeting remotely is the best that can be done. So how do you maximize the experience in order to get the most effective results from remote board meetings?

  1. First, double-check your local laws regarding remote board meetings.

Most states in the U.S. allow the practice as long as all members of the board can hear everything that is spoken and respond in real-time.
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Better Board Meetings in the New Year

better board meetings in 2017

Launching into the New Year is all about personal improvement and goal setting, so why not extend that “can do” attitude to the boardroom, too? Here are some practices you can employ to ensure that you bring your very best to the table in 2017.

  1. Prepare prepare prepare.

It’s easy to overlook this basic board member function, but it’s your duty as a director to come to meetings ready to participate to the best of your ability. At Directorpoint, we encourage admins to get board books and related meeting information out to directors early, so they can spend time reviewing it before meetings begin. More prep time means more time that board members can spend on strategic thinking instead of being bogged down in reports and reviewing older information.
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‘Twas the Night Before the Board Meeting

Twas the night before the board meeting

‘Twas the night before the board meeting
And all through the boardroom
The admins were retreating
In worry and gloom

The board books were placed
At the table with care
But last minute adjustments
Had staff pulling out all their hair

Oh no! Delete that chart
Shouted one to the team
We’ll just have to restart
At the printer full steam!

The directors were arriving
At the office post haste
While the admins were striving
To get the agenda replaced
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Higher Ed Boards: Finding the Governance Balance

Cartoon business executive character doing sky walking and balancing carefully on declining red arrow. Creative vector illustration on business risk and balancing act concept.

As the role of the higher education board widens, members are often faced with the reality of appearing too distant or as an interfering entity. Universities, in particular, place the role of the board in a difficult window of power. Board members must respect the open and forward-thinking nature of a campus setting, but they must also protect the trajectory of the college—especially in relation to its financial wellbeing. As David G. Turner writes for Trusteeship magazine, “Business models are shifting, funding sources are unpredictable, and learning channels are evolving; therefore, institutions must evolve and adapt in order to survive and thrive in the days ahead.”

As these shifts in higher educational systems continue to occur, board members are tasked with finding the unique balance between authority and negligence. One of the best ways to achieve this balance is by turning the board’s attention to strategic thinking. Oftentimes, higher ed boards become bogged down in the smaller aspects of campus life. Unlike with their corporate counterparts, strategic thinking and planning regularly get pushed aside for topics that are considered to be more “pressing.” This is a mistake. Although boards exist to financially protect the entity they serve, it’s difficult to achieve that if boards aren’t looking to the horizon for a vision of future growth and evolution.
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Board Software Transforms the Co-op Landscape

co-op electric board software

Utility cooperatives (co-ops) sometimes get a bad rap for using outdated processes. Many of them have been around for more than a century, so it’s no surprise that standards of procedure have been honed and crafted throughout the years. Technology and infrastructure are constantly evolving and growing; however, boardroom dynamics look largely the same as they did twenty years ago. Board responsibilities are increasing for every industry, so the pressure to ensure that co-ops succeed has fallen squarely on the shoulders of directors.

Board meeting software presents many unique benefits to boards of directors in the co-op field. First and foremost, it establishes easy access to important board information. While traditional, paper-based boards are confined to the information provided for a specific meeting, directors using board software can instantly access everything from past meeting materials to strategic plans, policy manuals, orientation materials, audit reports, and more.
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